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Throwline Basics
Published at Oct 19, 2015 | Posted by Tobe Sherrill

The mission of SHERRILLtree is to provide tree care professionals and climbers with the widest selection of quality tree gear, helpful information and superior service. Equipped with a passion for trees, SHERRILLtree hopes to inspire a deeper awareness that will ultimately benefit trees and people.

 

The mission of SHERRILLtree is to provide tree care professionals and climbers with the widest selection of quality tree gear, helpful information and superior service. Equipped with a passion for trees, SHERRILLtree hopes to inspire a deeper awareness that will ultimately benefit trees and people.

Step 1
Tie your weight to the line using a clove hitch with a slip. This will make the knot easy to untie upon returns
Throwline Step 1
Step 2
Tie a slipknot in the line at about thigh height. The overhand portion of this knot must be in the right direction for the knot to stay tied. If you can’t determine it from this image, it’s easier to understand with practice
Step 3
The slipknot you’ve just tied is needed for the one-hand throwing technique. This version generally produces higher throws but ...
Step 4
Is less accurate than when you use both hands.
Step 5
To accomplish the two-handed throw, thread a bite of line through the ring, while retaining the falling end of line in the opposite hand. Let the line out until the weight is a comfortable distance, yet not so long that it drags the ground.
Step 6
The third option is to use a BIG SHOT®. This giant slingshot on a stick launches common throw weights with the accuracy and power of a major league baseball pitcher. With skilled throwers being accurate up to about 60 feet, the BIG SHOT® gives rookies even better accuracy to more than 100 feet.
Step 7
If you miss, always allow the weight to fall to the ground, then untie it and drag it back through the brush, otherwise you’ll risk entangling your line.
Step 8
Like this.
Step 9
The next step is to thread on a friction-saving device. The devices are important, because they save your rope from abrasion and the tree from serious injury.
Step 10
Next, attach your climbing or rigging line. One popular technique is to use a series of two to three clove hitches with one at the end, which helps ease the rope’s passage over the branch. Another popular method for this is a double fisherman's knot with a half-hitch or marl on the end.
Step 11
Now you’re ready.
Step 12
Line storage is an important topic. Many storage methods have long proven to be time consuming, frustrating or downright nasty to line. Most climbers agree that flaking line (stacking it onto a pile end to end) is the best method. Don’t leave the weight tied to the line during storage, because all may become entangled. Done correctly, a line flaked in a bucket, bag or SHERRILLtree Cube can be shot out of its container nearly tangle-free every time. Have fun with it!